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Aglaonema Flowers: To Cut or Not to Cut, the 1 Simple Truth

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This post will answer all the common questions regarding Aglaonema flowers. You may also know this plant by the common name, Chinese Evergreen. Why and when do they bloom? What do they look like? What should you do with the flowers? All these questions and more will be answered.

aglaonema-flower

Does the Aglaonema Plant Bloom?

Yes, they sure do! The Aglaonema genus belongs to the Araceae (aroid) plant family. And like any aroid, they have a very distinctive inflorescence.

What is an inflorescence? Keep reading to find out.

What does an Aglaonema flower look like?

Technically, what you see in the photo below is the inflorescence, and not the flower. The central white structure is called the spadix, and behind it, you can see the light green spathe which is actually a modified leaf.

aglaonema-flower-closeup

Depending on the type of plant that you have, the inflorescence will look slightly different, but they will all have the same, main structures.

The flowers themselves are numerous, very tiny, and grow on the spadix.

In the photo below, you can see an inflorescence starting to form. You’ll know that it’s not a leaf because it will be a little more plump, and you’ll definitely know for sure when the inflorescence opens!

aglaonema-flower
A new Aglaonema inflorescence before opening

Once it is fully open, here is what it looks like.

aglaonema-flower

After a few weeks or so (unless you pollinate it), you’ll notice that the spadix starts to dry out and wither away (lower left in the photo below).

The plant below also has another developing inflorescence (upper right).

aglaonema-flower

Why is my Aglaonema flowering?

In general, they can bloom if you’re taking great care of them, but they can also bloom in response to stress! Funny right?

Although they are wonderful low-light plants, if you give them sufficient light and keep them happy and healthy, they will often bloom. Mine usually bloom multiple times per year.

Conversely, many plants will also bloom if they are stressed and think that they’re dying (think of it as a last ditch effort to reproduce and form seed!)

aglaonema-flower
A plump inflorescence on one of my Aglaonema plants.

When do Aglaonema plants flower?

Although they can bloom at any time of year, they will tend to bloom the most during late Winter, as well as Spring and Summer.

How long do Aglaonema flowers last?

I’ve never recorded how long the inflorescences last, but they will definitely last at least a few weeks on your plant.

Should I cut the flower off my Aglaonema?

Here is the age old question! This is a personal choice, and you can either leave them on, or cut them off.

When I first started growing Aglaonema plants, and I saw the unusual inflorescences grow, I was curious and allowed them to continue to grow so I could see what they looked like.

Now, whenever I see them grow, I do cut them off. No one grows Chinese Evergreen plants for their flowers.

But the most important part is, by trimming off the inflorescences, you can “redirect” your plant’s energy into growing their beautiful foliage instead.

aglaonema-flower
Watering one of my blooming Aglaonema ‘Cutlass’. (I think I cut off the inflorescence right after I took this photo).

On plants like Aglaonema Pictum Tricolor, it is particularly important to cut off the inflorescence, so go ahead and cut them off as soon as you notice them.

Otherwise, these are notorious for stunted growth and smaller leaves if you don’t cut off the inflorescences.

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I hope you’ve enjoyed this post on Aglaonema flowers.

Be sure not to miss my Aglaonema ultimate care guide so that you can ensure your plants are thriving! I include all care aspects, propagation, and also show some popular cultivars.

Randy Schultz

Friday 15th of April 2022

Great story! And thanks again for writing a wonderful How to Repot a Peace Lily story for HomeGardenandHomestead.com!

Raffaele

Saturday 16th of April 2022

Thanks Randy!

Kathy Jentz

Thursday 14th of April 2022

Great tip! I'm certainly guilty of leaving spent blooms on my houseplants far longer than I should. Getting out the floral snips to take care of some of them now.

Raffaele

Friday 15th of April 2022

It's hard to keep up sometimes with all the duties :-)